Monday, 8 May 2017

Tenth Philosophy Seminar

Please note the time and place!!!

Time -- From 1 to 3 (not 11 to 1).
Place -- Matariki 430 (not Logie 104).


Thursday, 16 March 2017

Philosophy Research Seminar

Zombies, Schmonceivability and the Mirroring Objection: All Escape-Routes Barred

Speaker: Doug Campbell,
University of Canterbury, Philosophy Department

Abstract: The “zombie argument” is a famous argument against physicalism, due to the Australian philosopher, David Chalmers. Is it sound? Recently three philosophers at the UC (myself, Jack Copeland, and Zhao-Ran Deng) have argued that it isn’t, using what we called the “mirror argument”. Chalmers has responded that the mirror argument has a flaw. In this talk I show why Chalmers is wrong, and why he has no viable means of defending the zombie argument.

Time: Tuesday 21 March, 11am—1pm

Place: Logie 104

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Philosophy Research Seminar

The History of Free Speech in Denmark

Speaker: Frederik Stjernfelt,
Aalborg University Copenhagen, Erskine Fellow in Philosophy

Abstract: Ever since the 2006 "Cartoon Crisis", Free Speech issues have been high on the agenda in Denmark. Recently, the law scholar Jacob Mchangama and myself published a large 1000-pages history of the issue - based on our common stance as "free speech fundamentalists". This paper presents some highlights: the 1620 and 1719 court cases against Dybvad and Dippel, the 1770 complete abolishment of censorship by Struensee (a candidat for a world's first), the 1797 doctrine of Michael Birckner - and of course the Cartoon Crisis and its aftermath.

Time: Tuesday 14 March, 11am—1pm


Place: Logie 104

Monday, 27 February 2017

Philosophy Research Seminar

Democratic Contradictions of Multiculturalism

Speaker: Frederik Stjernfelt,
Aalborg University Copenhagen, Erskine Fellow in Philosophy


Abstract: The concept of "multiculturalism" comes in a variety of versions, descriptive and normative, soft and hard. It is often overlooked - thus in MC theorists like Kymlicka and Charles Taylor - that strong tensions may appear in the relation between basic democratic norms like human rights and rule of law on the one hand and "hard" multiculturalisms on the other. This paper argues that it is important to articulate a "soft" multiculturalism compatible with basic liberal and democratic principles.

Time: Tuesday 7 March, 11am—1pm


Place: Logie 104